Why Your Advertising Isn’t Working

Why your advertising doesn't work

“The sales rep said this was the right schedule. “

“This worked the last time we did it.”

“I’m probably not spending enough money.”

“I’m probably using the wrong media.”

We’ve all been caught at the end of an anemic ad campaign wondering what happened, thinking the best we can hope for is to have learned one more thing not to do.

Then paralysis sets in. We can’t pull the trigger on the next ad campaign. We over-analyze every option but can’t seem to make a decision. How can we be confident that our ad dollars are not wasted?

While there is no guarantee that any advertising campaign will deliver the exact results you dream of, there are ways to tip the scales in your favor. Here’s a checklist to get you started:

Media:

The media you choose should be appropriate for delivering your message     most effectively to your most profitable audience. Ask reps for numbers to support their claims. Compare each medium by using a standard measure, such as “cost per thousand” impressions. If you need help, let me know.

Market:

Your target market is your best customer, or the one who costs you the least             and makes you the most. Define your best customer. Profile them. Look for customers that meet that profile. Ask your media reps if they can deliver that kind of customer. Is it their sweet spot?

Message:

You can make any medium work if your message is powerful enough. Pick any medium. How about a sandwich board on the slowest corner of town? Sounds pretty drab, right? Now write this on the board: “Free $100 bills. No questions asked.” How many responses would you get?

Money:

The key is to work from a budget. Stop making advertising decisions based    on how you feel, and work from a plan with a pre-determined budget. Don’t buy advertising based on what you like. You are not your customer! Decide on what success means to you and measure everything against it.

Still have questions? That’s why I’m here. I can help you build your ad campaign with 26 years of experience and a track record of success.

David Day is a marketing coach, brand architect, consultant, and ad agency owner. He helps clients make good decisions about marketing, advertising, and company culture. Connect with David at dday@thedaygroup.com

4 Comments on “Why Your Advertising Isn’t Working”

  1. A-sheep-LikeFaith

    Dave:
    I have about 3 legs of what I am trying to do right now: 1. A Sheep-Like Faith is ministry based & covers all local personal appearances for demonstrations (Christian & secular) but also writing & eventually publishing. 2. Gently Shorn Sheep Shearing is for my shearing clients. It is also my supply source. 3. Wool of LA is my etsy store where I sell wool for spinning, & yarn professionally milled from wool I sheared.
    Question #1: Do I keep these things as separate presences online, or put them all on one website?
    Question #2: What are the best online platforms to use if I want to 1. Share about my faith 2. Draw more local shearing clients to ultimately get more wool to mill
    3. Draw more fiber & yarn customers?
    Blog? Static website? Instagram? Different or multiple venues for each? How do I figure out most effective way(s) to represent myself (build my brand) online?
    Question #3: Am I building one whole brand with 3-4 facets, (demonstrating, sharing about sheep in Bible, shearing, wool sales) or better to separate sales from ministry??
    Since my potentials market is 3 or 4 different groups of people, I wonder if I need to create separate brand images for each, or try to do something that appeals to all (& risk pleasing none??)

    All your information is extremely helpful! I forward you to everyone I think may benefit from this.

    1. dday99

      Hey Kelli!
      Whew- those were some great questions. I’m not sure I can provide definitive answers for you as much as I might be able to help you figure that out. Hard to answer without knowing more. Definitely consider combining them of the audience is the same, but if not, there are ways to “cross-pollinate” the brands online. I love your idea for ASLF. Wasn’t aware of the others – but that’s ok. If you would like, we can perhaps connect and work on these answers in the marketing coach program. I totally understand if you are not interested in that though. Let me know your thoughts and we can talk more.

  2. A-sheep-LikeFaith

    The audiences are not the same, but cross pollinating does happen. Once I get someone’s attention for one part, there is always a chance they’ll at least check out one of the others. I understand different social networking platforms are important for specific, separate purposes, but I need help navigating some of that.

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